Pakistan Floods: Lessons learned from other flooding disasters

03/08/2010 at 9:17 pm 2 comments

As people in Pakistan struggle to recover from the catastrophic flooding in many parts of that country, and Irish aid agencies are assisting the most vulnerable people, Dóchas encourages members of the public to learn more about the principles of effective humanitarian aid: by logging onto www.HowYouCanHelp.ie.

As is the case with most disasters, the impact of these floods is not determined by the extent of the floodwater alone: the most vulnerable people, those who are poor and marginalised, suffer the most. International relief should therefore target these people most clearly. Over the years, Irish aid agencies have learned valuable lessons in responding to emergencies arising from floods. Some of these lessons include:

-          Reaching those most in need: In flood situations, it is often difficult to ensure that vulnerable people can access assistance. Aid agencies must dedicate resources aimed at overcoming these obstacles, and not simply concentrate on those people that are easiest to reach.

-          Helping people to cope: Vulnerable people develop their own means and strategies to cope with flooding. Programmes that directly support communities and their local organisations in their own efforts work best, both in the short and the long term.

-          Needs assessment: Conditions on the ground, not donor priorities, should determine aid programmes. All aid must help people most in need, and it must be the right kind, based on accurate information received from the disaster area. Aid must be provided in consultation with the local authorities and communities.

-          Tailoring aid: Affected communities are not a homogeneous group – people have different livelihoods, options and priorities. Aid must be based on an explicit identication of such needs and capabilities.

-          Going beyond the obvious: Needs assessments and relief programmes should go beyond current needs, and assess structural causes of vulnerability. While in the first instance relief is about saving lives, aid should be delivered and designed to contribute to a long-term improvement of people’s lives, and the prevention of future catastrophes.

-          Flood Risk Reduction: Flood management must cover entire catchment areas, and should include genuine participation of the area’s population. Flood protection should go beyond “technical fixes” and include socio-economic considerations.

-          Early warning: Poor people need early warning most, but many of them do not understand weather forecasting or the language of early warning. Special attention must be paid to ensure early warning mechanisms are appropriate for those groups most at risk.

Recommended further reading:

Entry filed under: Development Effectiveness, NGOs, Overseas aid. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Live Aid, Dead Aid and Smart Aid How you can help people back from the brink

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Water Games  |  19/10/2011 at 9:17 pm

    I believe it include all supplementary info so it exceptionally nice initiative by site owner thus thanks to owner intended for this thinking.

    Reply
  • [...] Lessons learned from the Pakistan flood [...]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 184 other followers

Archives

Dóchas on Twitter

The World's Best News - images

Egyptian women laugh as they ride back home on a donkey cart, after a days work in the fields near Cairo, in Giza, #Egypt.

Photo by @taratwphoto
Tara Todras-Whitehill

Thanks to @everydayafrica

#egypt #africa #worldsbestnews #upliftingnews #everydayafrica Mother Kapinga glazes her fresh-from-the-oven bread in the village of Kalomba, DRC. 
There are several ovens in the village where the women bring their dough to bake into bread when available. 
Photo by Jana Ašenbrennerová (@asenbrennerova ) taken in Kasai Occidental, Democratic Republic of Congo, July 13, 2014. 
#drc #drcongo #asenbrennerova #africa #bread #oven #positive Look what our colleague Emma brought into the office!

Sign up, to help spread the good news on 26 September: coordinator@actnow2015.ie or anna@dochas.ie "Climate Smart Villages"

The Asia Development Bank recently warned that the impact of altered weather patterns could cause huge damage to the Indian economy, wiping off the equivalent of about 9% of GDP each year by the next century.

So it is critical to adapt. And villages n India are showing that technology can play a key role.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29257401 Mobile kindergartens, anyone?

Uplifting news from ‪#Mongolia, in this video showing how mobile #kindergartens give nomadic children their first taste of organised learning: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pImRJHJATGw All our good news stories on Instagram, now grouped by theme:

http://websta.me/n/worldsbestnews/board These students at Udassa Repi Elementary School enjoy a meal of maize and haricot beans from local farmers.

This school meals programme supports education by developing schools into community centres promoting good nutrition. (Photo: WFP/Kiyori Ueno, 25 November 2013)

Ethiopia #Africa #worldsbestnews #education #schools #globaldev #MDGs “Iraq's artists defy extremists with bows, brushes and a low profile”
They say they can fight against the brutality of today's Iraq with
universities, music and galleries.

Listen to this story about Iraq, that is NOT about extremists, airstrikes or politics:

http://ijpr.org/post/iraqs-artists-defy-extremists-bows-brushes-and-low-pr
ofile?utm_referrer=http%3A//m.ijpr.org/%3Futm_referrer%3Dhttp%253A%252F%25
2Ft.co%252FZULXeSCyPm%23mobile/19165

Photo: Gallery owner Qassim Sabti. "We just make art for art," he says. Photo: Graham Smith NPR

#iraq #art #worldsbestnews #positive Ever heard of the “#Potato Centre of Excellence”? From today’s Irish Times: "The Potato Centre of Excellence … acts as the driver for the Irish Potato Coalition, an initiative involving Irish and international NGOs working to share knowledge across six countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique and Kenya – that account for four million potato farmers. Their aim is to maximise the benefit that potatoes can provide to rural communities by connecting farmers, researchers, the private sector and local organisations." Read more at http://www.irishtimes.com/business/potatoes-are-nuggets-to-save-ethiopia-as-ireland-shares-years-of-expertise-1.1927105 
Photo: Gebremedhin Woldegiorgis, senior potato researcher at the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, and Denis Griffen, potato breeder at Teagas, inspect potato plants at the Teagasc Research Centre in Oakpark, Carlow. photograph: dylan vaughan Is Mulitani the happiest mother in Malawi? 
Read her story and find out why at https://charitywater.exposure.co/mulitani 
Photo: @estherhavens

Visitors Map

Map

Dóchas Photos

undermining 0.7

tanaiste

More Photos

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 184 other followers

%d bloggers like this: