Why we are going to Busan

24/11/2011 at 12:50 pm 1 comment

Five Irish NGO representatives are now on their way to Busan, South Korea, for an international summit on better aid.

The “Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness” (HLF-4) brings together ministers, government representatives, parliamentarians, civil society organisations and private sector representatives from across the globe.

The purpose of the meeting is to launch a new “development compact” – a comprehensive vision for development cooperation, along with an action plan to guide development cooperation in the coming years.

As Minister O’Sullivan recently put it in her address to the Oireachtas:

“In the 1990s it became clear that the traditional approaches to development were not having the desired impact. There were too many isolated projects which were not coordinated nor led by developing countries. This led to a duplication of effort and a waste of resources.

A new approach, based on evaluations and lessons learned over many years was agreed internationally in 2005 in an agreement know as the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness.”

The Busan summit is intended to take stock of progress made on implementing the Paris principles, and updating them, to include the “new actors”, such as China, India and private philanthropists.

Irish NGOs will attend the summit, to remind Governments and philanthropists that “Development” cannot happen without the active participation of citizens and civic structures in the social, economic and political processes that shape their countries.

And we will urge the Minister, who will represent Ireland at the summit, to take an active role defending the principle of civil society action, and to ensure that the summit declaration contains strong and tangible references to the obligation of states to create the conditions that enable civil society to grow and flourish – This includes respect for the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, the right to freedom of expression, and the need for clear legislation to support the role of civil society.

Our lobby over the past number of weeks has already paid off: the most recent drafts of the summit negotiation text is much better when it comes to references to the importance of human rights and civic action.

We are now going to the summit itself, to make sure that, at a time when Governments across the developing world are attempting to rein in the role of NGOs, the Busan summit sends a strong signal that sustainable Development cannot be achieved without a strong and active role for each country’s own citizens.


Further reading:

 

See also:

Entry filed under: Development Effectiveness. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Busan needs leadership on civil society space NGOs gather in Busan to speak truth to power, once more

1 Comment Add your own

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 182 other followers

Archives

Dóchas on Twitter

The World's Best News - images

"Climate Smart Villages"

The Asia Development Bank recently warned that the impact of altered weather patterns could cause huge damage to the Indian economy, wiping off the equivalent of about 9% of GDP each year by the next century.

So it is critical to adapt. And villages n India are showing that technology can play a key role.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29257401 Mobile kindergartens, anyone?

Uplifting news from ‪#Mongolia, in this video showing how mobile #kindergartens give nomadic children their first taste of organised learning: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pImRJHJATGw All our good news stories on Instagram, now grouped by theme:

http://websta.me/n/worldsbestnews/board These students at Udassa Repi Elementary School enjoy a meal of maize and haricot beans from local farmers.

This school meals programme supports education by developing schools into community centres promoting good nutrition. (Photo: WFP/Kiyori Ueno, 25 November 2013)

Ethiopia #Africa #worldsbestnews #education #schools #globaldev #MDGs “Iraq's artists defy extremists with bows, brushes and a low profile”
They say they can fight against the brutality of today's Iraq with
universities, music and galleries.

Listen to this story about Iraq, that is NOT about extremists, airstrikes or politics:

http://ijpr.org/post/iraqs-artists-defy-extremists-bows-brushes-and-low-pr
ofile?utm_referrer=http%3A//m.ijpr.org/%3Futm_referrer%3Dhttp%253A%252F%25
2Ft.co%252FZULXeSCyPm%23mobile/19165

Photo: Gallery owner Qassim Sabti. "We just make art for art," he says. Photo: Graham Smith NPR

#iraq #art #worldsbestnews #positive Ever heard of the “#Potato Centre of Excellence”? From today’s Irish Times: "The Potato Centre of Excellence … acts as the driver for the Irish Potato Coalition, an initiative involving Irish and international NGOs working to share knowledge across six countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique and Kenya – that account for four million potato farmers. Their aim is to maximise the benefit that potatoes can provide to rural communities by connecting farmers, researchers, the private sector and local organisations." Read more at http://www.irishtimes.com/business/potatoes-are-nuggets-to-save-ethiopia-as-ireland-shares-years-of-expertise-1.1927105 
Photo: Gebremedhin Woldegiorgis, senior potato researcher at the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, and Denis Griffen, potato breeder at Teagas, inspect potato plants at the Teagasc Research Centre in Oakpark, Carlow. photograph: dylan vaughan Is Mulitani the happiest mother in Malawi? 
Read her story and find out why at https://charitywater.exposure.co/mulitani 
Photo: @estherhavens 44-year-old Thauzeni Theka is a member of a small-scale irrigation group that's been supported by Self Help Africa in Mkhonde village, Malawi.

He's been growing tomatoes and cabbage since 2010, and has used the money he has earned to buy two bicycles (inset), four goats, and new tin sheets to re-roof his house. 
Thauzeni says he is also sending all of his kids to school with the money he is earning on the project. 
#Malawi #agriculture #tomatoes Vanilla from the DRC.

Indonesia and Madagascar are the world's largest producers. But farmers in Eastern Congo are now also exporting it.

Vanilla is the second most expensive spice after saffron, because growing the vanilla seed pods is labour-intensive. Six kilos of the green pods, for which the farmers receive some €44, results in about 1 kilo of brown pods which, once milled, packed and shipped, sells for some €75 per kilo to companies that use the spice.

Photo: workers processing the vanilla pod harvest.

#vanilla #congo #drc #africa #worldsbestnews #trade #spices In #Somalia, school meals are helping more girls continue in school, including these at the Abdirahman Godyare primary #school.

Girls have often been expected to stay home and help with chores, but the daily meals encourage families to continue sending them to class. (Photo: WFP/Laila Ali, 21 October 2013)

Visitors Map

Map

Dóchas Photos

undermining 0.7

tanaiste

More Photos

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 182 other followers

%d bloggers like this: