Can we afford overseas aid in times of crisis?

25/08/2010 at 10:20 am 5 comments

Of course we can!

* Instead of not being able to afford overseas aid, we cannot afford to give less aid. The government has rightly indicated that for us to get out of this recession, we need to repair the damage to our reputation on the global stage. This reputation depends on our reliability and our willingness to honour our promises to the international community.

* Aid is now not less affordable than before. The aid target is set in % of national income, meaning the aid budget goes up and down in line with the economy. In other words, it is equally difficult in good times as in bad to adhere to the target; in both cases it’s not a case of affordability, but of courage of conviction.

* “Aid” is not a luxury, a pass-time for the rich. Aid is our “membership fee” for belonging to the international community of nations. It is a practical expression of our nation’s wish to cooperate with other countries and to help them weather the storms of global economic turbulence.

* Aid is not charity; it’s an investment in the future. By assisting other countries in their efforts to escape poverty, we are investing in future partnerships and future trade relations. Much like Ireland in the 1980s, developing countries will remember those countries that stood by them in their hour of need, and they will have a natural inclination to work and trade with them.

* Cutting the aid budget is short-sighted. It will do nothing for our own economy, but will have a dramatic impact on the world’s poorest people. The entire aid budget amounts to some 1% of the government’s current expenditure and cutting it will have virtually no impact on our national debt, or on the economic growth rate.

* In 1847, in the time of the Irish famine, a group of Choctaw Indians in the USA collected $710 – small fortune for these very poor and marginalised people – and sent it to help starving people in Ireland. In their poverty, the Choctaws reached out to an Irish nation in dire need. We’d do well to recall such generosity now, when 1 in 6 people on the planet does not have enough to eat.

Entry filed under: Overseas aid. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

In defence of NGO overhead costs Aiding Pakistan

5 Comments Add your own

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 209 other followers

Archives

Dóchas on Twitter

The World's Best News - images

Surfing beach vendors of Bangladesh.

A group of 10-12 year old beach vendors in #Bangladesh, most of whom have dropped out of school to help support their families, have taken up #surfing.

24 year old surfer, lifeguard and beach worker Rashed Alam has been teaching the girls at his school/surf club. Like the girls, Alam dropped out of #school and started working on the beach to help support his family at a young age. He started surfing when he was 16. He says that his way of giving back is by ensuring that girls get a good future through surfing.

Read more at http://blog.allisonjoyce.com/?p=486 In #Iran, a female student gets to design and build a spectacular bridge.

Tabiat (“nature”) bridge, the largest of its kind in Iran, was architect Leila Araghian’s first project. She designed it five years ago while a student, winning a local competition for a plan to connect two parks separated by a highway in north Tehran.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/20/bridge-tehran-architect-iran-leila-araghian-tabiat-sanctions-iranian-designers

#Architects #architecture #women #globaldev #sanctions At “The World’s Best News” we’re on a mission: 
We want to bust some of the enduring myths about global development. 
You can help us by sharing / re-gramming  any of our news stories, so that others will see that extreme poverty has been halved and that developing countries are making huge progress.

Spread the word! “#Baghdad is where everything is happening – it’s like New York." Meet the artists hoping to reinstate Iraq's place in the contemporary art world: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/19/art-in-iraq

Photo: Hussein Adel with one of his drawings. He sells cartoons to newspapers to help pay the rent. Photograph: Ahmad Mousa/Corbis Marooned indefinitely in a desolate wasteland in #Jordan,  it would be easy for these #refugees to give up hope. 
But despite the horrors they have seen and the hardships they now face, the people profiled in this article show resilience and creativity, using their ingenuity to make life better for themselves and those around them. 
Read three inspiring profiles: 
http://tracks.unhcr.org/2015/03/the-inventors-of-azraq/

Photo: Since fleeing #Syria, Jihad, 52, has built a windmill-powered lamp, a mousetrap, a running water tap and other useful items for his home and community in Azraq camp. UNHCR/Jessica Chen Can 'supergeeks' save #Kenya's babies? 
Read about this programme by #Irish NGO Concern which links #healthcare workers and technology students to find innovative high-quality low-cost solutions for #maternity wards in Kenya. 
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32255445 Meet the global feminists changing the world for girls, from Kenya to Egypt.

Around the world, people are not content to sit and complain;
They get up, and take action!

Here are some inspirational young women who are doing just that:

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/apr/13/meet-the-global-feminists-changing-the-world-for-girls-from-kenya-to-egypt

#feminism #women #citizenaction #globaldev #positive #positivenews In #Mozambique, African giant pouched rats are helping to clear #landmines left around, after 23 years of civil war.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/africa/why-mozambique-s-rats-are-man-s-best-friend-1.2170059 
Photo: Apopo deminer Victor Boquico gives a banana treat to 'Mocadas 53', who has just found TNT in the soil at the landmine clearance site Dombe in Manica province, Mozambique. 
Photo: Mary Boland #NigeriaDecides.

Despite the threats from the extremist group Boko Haram, this weekend 60 million people voted to shape the future of Nigeria.

At The World's Best News, we like elections. Have a read of these 3 stories:

Africa and democracy:
http://worldsbestnews.tumblr.com/post/102036767325/nothing-ever-changes-have-a-look-at-these

India: http://worldsbestnews.tumblr.com/post/85901866700/the-biggest-elections-on-earth-this-years

Mobile app mobilises voters in Nigeria: 
http://worldsbestnews.tumblr.com/post/90836673125/using-technology-to-bolster-democracy

Photo: AFP Do you remember the movie Slumdog Millionaire?

It made #Mumbai's Dharavi district, one of the world's largest #slums, famous the world over.

The group Slum Gods are proud of their area, but it needs a new image - and they will #dance and #rap to make sure it gets one. 
Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/nov/28/slumgods-mumbai-hip-hop-dharavi

Photo: Akash and Sagar of the SlumGods. Photograph: Benita Fernando The small Central American country of #CostaRica is meeting its energy needs without burning fossil fuels.

Thanks to some heavy rainfall this year, Costa Rica’s #hydropower plants alone are generating nearly enough electricity to power the entire country. With a boost from geothermal, solar, and #windenergy sources, the country doesn’t need an ounce of coal or petroleum to keep the lights on.

Read more: http://qz.com/367985/costa-rica-is-now-running-completely-on-renewable-energy/ How Ethiopia managed to supply water to 48 million people:

In 1990, only 6.9 million Ethiopians drank water from a tap or hand pump, rather than from an open stream. However, in the last 25 years #Ethiopia has managed to supply #water to 55 million people (10x the entire population of #Ireland!) The key to this success has been a combination of strong government leadership and persistent donor investment.

Read more: http://blogs.unicef.org/2015/03/23/how-ethiopia-managed-to-supply-water-to-48-million-people/

Photo: The Ebo clean water project benefits 27, 000 people in seven villages including 15,000 school children, with clean water in their school and households. Young girls now can attend school regularly without spending more time looking for water. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Bizuwerk

Visitors Map

Map

Dóchas Photos

1506_77

1506_76

More Photos

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 209 other followers

%d bloggers like this: