The NGO of the Future?

28/12/2010 at 10:36 pm 8 comments

In early 2008, Dóchas wrote a discussion paper, presenting its member organisations with the outlines of a few of the major challenges facing Irish Development NGOs.

In essence, the paper argued that the context in which Development NGOs are operating is changing rapidly, and that their independence, integrity, credibility and relevance were increasingly called into question. Dóchas saw the solution in increased NGO accountability, and the introduction of NGO Codes of Conduct.

Internationally, NGOs are increasingly waking up to the importance of self-regulation and increased impact. The CSO Development Effectiveness discussions have led to the articulation of a series of principles for the work of Development NGOs, which are intended to guide the future work of organisations aiming to eradicate extreme poverty.

So will the NGO of the future be transparent, accountable, focused on people’s empowerment, and basing its work on a framework of human rights, as the Istanbul Principles would have it? And is that enough?

The NGO of the future should see itself not just as an efficient and accountable machine – it should be the ultimate networking organisation (as argued in this article in Dutch).

In a increasingly globalising world, NGOs can be the link within, and between, societies. NGOs of the future are not merely project implementers, they bring people together and bridge cultural, economic and religious divides. NGOs mediate, dialogue, unite, and engage people. Rather than doers, the NGOs of the future are matchmakers, facilitators and catalysts. NGOs provide the platform where others can utilise their own creativity – the iPhone for other people’s apps, so to speak.

The NGO of the future knows that “partners” are not just the donors and the NGOs in developing countries. It teams up with companies, academics and any other institution or individual that can help it achieve its mission. It knows that innovation is key, and it has the curiosity to want to learn more. It knows how to reach people, how to engage them, and how to inspire them to action.

The NGO of the future knows that it can crowdsource and map data and information from all corners of the earth. It knows that proactive transparency is becoming the norm, as data is increasingly made available through databases like AidData, Aid Flows and UNdata.

In short, the NGO of the future is ‘The Networked Nonprofit’, with high quality relationships with all their stakeholders, able to use those relationships to learn, improve their impact and meet quality standards.

It could be you.

Further reading:

 

Entry filed under: Development Effectiveness, NGOs, Overseas aid. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

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The world's fastest growing economies:

Half of the countries in this list of 13 booming economies are in Africa: 
http://worldsbestnews.tumblr.com/post/125151379280/the-13-fastest-growing-economies-in-the-world #positivenews The first #malaria vaccine has received the green light from European regulators, opening the door for vaccination campaigns for infants in #Africa.

Malaria is a disease of poverty. It affects poor people disproportionately, and it fuels poverty, as it slows economic growth and worsens other disease burdens, particular HIV and Aids.

But there is good news: The number of malaria deaths has almost halved since 2002, and now a new malaria vaccine has been approved, which should help protect very young #children against the disease.

Read this article: http://www.scidev.net/global/malaria/news/malaria-vaccine-green-light-mosquirix.html?utm_content=buffer1ea54&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Also read: http://www.thejournal.ie/readme/malaria-treatment-vaccine-research-1428826-Apr2014/ On September 17th hundreds of volunteers around the country will mobilise to spread the positive news of development!

They will be handing out "the World's Best News newspaper" and joining in other activities nationwide. 
The EYD team and the Dóchas membership are working hard to produce this year's World's Best News newspaper which will be published in September. 
Details of the activities on September 17th will follow shortly. 
We would love to have you on board!

If you would like to be involved in the distribution/ activities on the day please write to the EYD team at eyd@dochas.ie Good news: far fewer people are now hurt by land mines and old unexploded ammunition.

Thanks to an international ban on mines, and intensive mine clearing, it’s now possible for more people in previous conflict zones to stand on their own legs.

Read more here: bit.ly/1T1iFpN Good news! 
Between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of the global population using an improved drinking water source has increased from 76 per cent to 91 per cent, surpassing the MDG target, which was met in 2010.

Of the 2.6 billion people who have gained access since 1990, 1.9 billion use a piped drinking water supply on premises. The world has reason to celebrate.

This new #UN report shows that the world has good reason to celebrate the huge progress in the fight against #poverty, #hunger and #disease.

From the report: "At the beginning of the new millennium, world leaders gathered at the United Nations to shape a broad vision to fight poverty in its many dimensions. That vision, which was translated into eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), has remained the overarching development framework for the world for the past 15 years.

As we reach the end of the MDG period, the world community has reason to celebrate. Thanks to concerted global, regional, national and local efforts, the MDGs have saved the lives of millions and improved conditions for many more.

The data and analysis presented in this report prove that, with targeted interventions, sound strategies, adequate resources and political will, even the poorest countries can make dramatic and
unprecedented progress. The report also acknowledges uneven achievements and shortfalls in many areas. The work is not complete, and it must continue in the new development era.” http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/2015_MDG_Report/pdf/MDG%202015%20rev%20(July%201).pdf How often have you heard people say there isn't enough food in the world?

Not true. There is enough food to feed everyone, and there is room to grow more! 
Just read how this project in Madagascar is helping smallholder farmers achieve bigger harvests.

http://bit.ly/1IV0g6H 
Photo: A horizontal view of the rice plantations near Tsivory village, #Madagascar. ©IFAD/Rindra Ramasomanana Good news for the weekend:

#Cuba has become the first country in the world stop HIV transmission from mother to child. "Cuba's success demonstrates that universal access and universal #health coverage are feasible and indeed are the key to success, even against challenges as daunting as #HIV." http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/07/01/us-cuba-health-iduskcn0pa2b520150701?utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A+Trending+Content&utm_content=5593757e04d3013e4e000001&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=facebook

Photo: A nurse hands out a red ribbon to a woman, to mark World Aids Day, at the entrance of Emilio Ribas Hospital, in Sao Paulo December 1, 2014. 
REUTERS/NACHO DOCE Happy International #Yoga Day!

Have a look at some of these pictures of African yoga: - http://ireland.ashoka.org/yoga-africa-transforming-young-minds-hearts-and-livelihoods
- http://www.africayogaproject.org/
- http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2014/04/pictures-yoga-bends-trends-kenya-20144494348396640.html 
Photo: Susan Njeri practices the Wheel Pose on the railway line at the entrance of #Kibera "This will be the largest privately-owned #solar power plant in Africa." http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/worldBusiness/artikel.php?ID=361671&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=post&utm_term=solar+plant+in+ghana+that&utm_campaign=Climate&__surl__=IgD8H&__ots__=1434360286047&__step__=1

#ghana #solar #renewables India’s first public skate park.

Rumbling trucks, roaming cows and honking tuk-tuks make skateboarding a risky pastime on the often potholed streets of India. So last year, a group of professional skateboarders joined together with a group of local volunteers to build #India’s first public #skate park. 
Here, street kids and young professionals alike can take a break and skate for free after a hard day’s work. As an added bonus the young skaters also receive free English lessons.

Read more about ‘the best skatepark in Asia’ here: bit.ly/1BYel0D

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