What does the future hold for Irish NGOs?

26/03/2011 at 4:21 pm 3 comments

For some years now, Dóchas has been promoting discussion about the quality of Development NGO work. And we have argued that Accountability is the key to greater Quality: if you set clear standards, encourage meaningful participation of everyone affected by your work, and are transparent about your decision-making, then your decisions and activities will result in greater impact.

The second part of our Quality strategy has been to get NGOs to share experiences, and to get them to document what works, and what doesn’t. NGOs that want to be effective, must have a clear idea, not just about their aims and values, but also about the precise nature of the role that they are seeking to play: their “Theory of Change”.

And on that basis, they should consider if, and how, their role is changing.

This week, Irish NGOs were invited by Trócaire to do some more thinking about their changing roles. The publication of the “Leading Edge 2020” report provided a good opportunity to confront NGOs with criticism, and with scenarios for the future.

The report echoed some of our own, now slightly out of date, analysis of the challenges facing Irish NGOs, and it prompted some good reflections from the likes of Lawrence Haddad, and bloggers like “How Matters”. In the same week, The Guardian also published a blog about the future of “aid”.

So, plenty of input for NGOs that are curious about the future. (And don’t forget our own little contribution about the NGO of the future).

And we will continue to try to ensure that they remain curious. For surely, curiosity must be a key ingredient for anyone aspiring to become better at what they do?

< Read the report at http://www.trocaire.org/leadingedge2020 >

NB: Dóchas’ AGM conference 2011 will focus on the “added value” of Irish NGOs.

Entry filed under: Development Effectiveness, NGOs, Overseas aid. Tags: , , , , , , .

Regulating Charities Getting ready for Busan: NGOs, civil society and an “enabling environment”

3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Ciarán Casey  |  29/03/2011 at 3:30 pm

    Difficulty is unless donors have a quantative way to measure quality, and allocate funds accordingly, the incentive isn’t really there. Definitely has to be donor-led, albeit with NGO support and action.

    Reply
  • 2. An Ode to Effective NGOs « Dochasnetwork's Blog  |  25/05/2011 at 4:54 pm

    [...] also spoke of the rapid, fundamental changes that our sector is experiencing, arising from such diverse factors as the MDGs, the “Aid Effectiveness” agenda, the changing [...]

    Reply
  • [...] in power, a greatly changed situation in Ireland and global trends from the Arab Spring to Development effectiveness; the government is now seeking to bring its policy on overseas development up to [...]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 180 other followers

Visitors Map

Map

Dóchas on Twitter

Archives

Dóchas Photos

undermining 0.7

tanaiste

More Photos

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 180 other followers

%d bloggers like this: